19 Responses

  1. Peter Herz
    Peter Herz at |

    I knew my love for Chocolate felt a bit primitive and overwhelming!

    Reply
  2. d87a7996-d786-11e2-b3f1-000bcdcb5194

    Wonder what things would have been like if the native cultures around the 1800′s had survived what amounts to a holocaust. Bet you we wouldn’t be worried about Syria today.

    Reply
  3. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    Wait – I’m confused. So the theobromine on these pots is found naturally in both holly leaves and cacao, but Dr. Washburn says it could only possibly have come from cacao in Central America? And the reason she is so certain of this is because the Holly, which only grew in Southeastern America but was actually found to be used by cultures in the Midwest couldn’t have also made it’s way to modern day Utah? I just don’t get it – The Pueblans definitely had trade routes with the Midwest – why is she so certain?

    Reply
    1. Anonymous
      Anonymous at |

      Because people believe what they want to believe.

      Reply
    2. Anonymous
      Anonymous at |

      “But the holly, Washburn said, is only found in the Southeastern United States, whereas cacao was a known staple of life and trade in Mesoamerica.”

      Because the holly was only used in rituals where they wanted to induce vomiting, whereas cocoa was a staple. She is stating that it is more likely that cultures traded staples, rather than very specialized ritual materials.

      Reply
      1. Joseph
        Joseph at |

        Sorry but pre-Columbian cocoa was not a stable; rather it was treated as high-status trade item even within Mesoamerica. Although the post-Classic Toltec of central Mexico produced a fine Orange Ware, there was a ceramic Ware-type actually made at Alkali Ridge known as Abajo Red-on-orange. Abajo Red-on-orange is somewhat of a unique Anasazi type as it appears to be a local copy of early southern Mogollon red-on-browns. This may prove interesting as the southern Mogollon region of southwest New Mexico and southeast Arizona historically served as the point of entry between the American southwest and Mesoamerica.

        Reply
        1. Joseph
          Joseph at |

          sorry Anonymous

          thats ”staple ” not ”stable.”

          Reply
  4. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    Interesting. The review of this article also does not mention that vessels in Chaco Canyon have been found with chocolate residue.

    Reply
  5. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    Also, chemical studies can be done on the “imported” pottery to source the clay and temper. I do not see that mentioned in this review.

    Reply
    1. Western Digger
      Western Digger at |

      Hi again. Just to clarify, the reporting is pretty lucid in stating that the ceramics are not imported, as that was one of the key points of the JAS study: “earlier tests of the clay had revealed them to have been made from local materials.” Thanks again for contributing, though.

      Reply
  6. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    I’m not saying it’s aliens, but….. It’s aliens.

    Reply
  7. Western Digger
    Western Digger at |

    Hi anon, thanks for commenting. I might be misunderstanding what you’re looking for, but in the second sentence — and a few references throughout the piece — our story cites the Chaco research pretty clearly:

    “The site dates back to the 8th century — 200 years earlier than the only other known evidence of the food, found at Chaco Canyon, the famous ceremonial and trade center of the Ancestral Puebloans.”

    If you’re looking for more, just drop us a line. Thanks again.

    Reply
  8. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    What do you think of something like the Southeastern Cultural Complex, or even the Hopewell Tradition, each of which had vast trade networks for items specific to class and ritual burial? Things like shell from the Gulf, grizzly teeth from the Rockies, flints, mica, and obsidian were imported so the higher-classes could reinforce their status and be ritually buried with exotic grave goods? I know it’s probably unlikely that high-status people in Utah were drinking this vomit drink to somehow reinforce their rank, but I think it’s totally plausible that it could have been imported for ritual purposes. To say that cacao is the only conclusion seems kind of closed-minded.

    Reply
  9. Anonymous
    Anonymous at |

    How can they know that the cacao was not contamination, from modern researchers handling the pieces?

    Reply
    1. Tom Billings
      Tom Billings at |

      If they have used standard excavation, handling, and bagging procedures, this should not happen. Chemical trace analysis is a standard physical anthropology technique by now, and I doubt such a team would be ignorant of its requirements visa vi contamination.

      Reply
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  13. Glenna
    Glenna at |

    Ilex vomitoria is native to Central Texas on the Edwards Plateau…and the Edwards Plateau extends west and southwest through San Antonio, thence to the state line

    Reply

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